Selections from Kreigh Tomaszewski's
Rock and Mineral Collection


Magnificent Obsessions Collection
Rockhounding A to Z

Rocks and Minerals displayed at the Grand Rapids Public Museum on December 12, 1998 by Kreigh Tomaszewski as the 'Rocks and Minerals' part of the Museum's 'Magnificent Obsessions - Collecting A to Z' exhibit. I hope to have pictures of this group of specimens up soon.

Kreigh's 'Magnificent Obsessions' Collection
Rockhounding A to Z
Principal Mineral(s) Formula Locality When Collected Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Comments Reference Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Azurite Cu3(OH)2(CO3)2 individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Mexico When Collected Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Named after the mineral's color by Robert Jameson in 1805; an earlier name was Blue Malachite. Reference #0319 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Azurite Cu3(OH)2(CO3)2 individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Morenci, Arizona When Collected Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Named after the mineral's color by Robert Jameson in 1805; an earlier name was Blue Malachite. Reference #0455 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Agate
(a variety of quartz)
SiO2 individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Lake Superior Shoreline, Michigan When Collected Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) The earliest written record of this name id by the Greek scientist Theophrastus (376 - 287 BC); it was named because the stone was found near the river Achatesin in southern Sicily (called the Dirillo river today). Reference #0452, #0453, #0454 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Aragonite with CaCO3 individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Placeros de Guadalupe, Mexico acquired 1980s Matrix Novacekite Named after the region of Aragon, Spain by Abraham Gottlob Werner in 1796. Reference #0380 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Amethyst (a variety of quartz) SiO2 individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Locality When Collected Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) It was believed by the ancients to have special powers and was named from the Greek word amethustos meaning anti-intoxicant or not drunken. #0224, #0225, #0226, #0227, #0228, #0229, #0230, #0231 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Barite BaSO4 individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

El Solar mine (level 4)
Taxco, Guerrero, Mexico
When Collected Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Named from the Greek word baros meaning weight or heavy by Dietrich Ludwig Gustav Karsten in 1800. Reference #0381 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Barite Rose Formula

Arizona When Collected Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Barite was named from the Greek word baros meaning weight or heavy by Dietrich Ludwig Gustav Karsten in 1800. Rose since the sand crystal takes a shape like that flower. Reference #0402, #0409 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Beryl (variety Aquamarine) Be3Al2Si6O18 individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Locality acquired 1960s Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Named from the Greek word beryllos and is believed to refer to Belur, a town in Southern India near gem deposits. Historically it was applied to green gemstones in general; use is very limited now (by chemistry). Reference #0392 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Biotite Mica K(Mg,Fe)3AlSi3O10(OH)2
Locality acquired 1960s Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Named in honor of French physicist Jean Baptiste Biot (who discovered different micas have different optical properties) by J.F.L. Hausmann in 1847. Reference #0372, #0373 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Calcite (optical) CaCO3 individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Locality acquired 1994 Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Named from the Latin word calx which means burnt lime. First use of the name was probably by Johann Karl Freisleben on 1836, but first use as applied today was probably by E.J. Chapman in 1843. Reference #0377, #0378, #0379 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Calcite CaCO3 individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Locality Lost 1960s Limestone Pyrargyrite, Pyrite This was one of my early specimens and I bought it at a silent auction at a Grand Rapids Rock and Mineral Society club meeting.
Named from the Latin word calx which means burnt lime. First use of the name was probably by Johann Karl Freisleben on 1836, but first use as applied today was probably by E.J. Chapman in 1843.
#0430 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Calcite CaCO3 individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Pugh Quarry, Ohio acquired 1960s Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Named from the Latin word calx which means burnt lime. First use of the name was probably by Johann Karl Freisleben on 1836, but first use as applied today was probably by E.J. Chapman in 1843. Reference #0429 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Calcite CaCO3 individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Quincy mine
Houghton, Michigan
1996 Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Named from the Latin word calx which means burnt lime. First use of the name was probably by Johann Karl Freisleben on 1836, but first use as applied today was probably by E.J. Chapman in 1843. Reference #0308 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Calcite CaCO3 individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Riverside, Calafornia When Collected Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Named from the Latin word calx which means burnt lime. First use of the name was probably by Johann Karl Freisleben on 1836, but first use as applied today was probably by E.J. Chapman in 1843. Reference #0383 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
White Celestite SrSO4 Clay Center, Ohio acquired 1960s Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) The first specimens found were pale blue and were named after the Latin word coelestis meaning heaven or sky by Abraham Gottlob Werner in 1798. Reference #0421 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Blue Celestite SrSO4 individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Clay Center, Ohio acquired 1960s Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) The first specimens found were pale blue and were named after the Latin word coelestis meaning heaven or sky by Abraham Gottlob Werner in 1798. Reference #0451 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Chalk (a variety of limestone) CaCO3 Dover, England acquired 1970s Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) From the well known White Cliffs of Dover; a Christmas Gift from a British pen-pal my Mother kept throughout her life. Reference #0360 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Chalcopyrite and Hematite CuFeS2
and
Fe2O3
individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Iron Bridge, Ontario, Canada 1981 Calcite Secondary Mineral(s) Chalcopyrite was named from two Greek words, chalcos meaning copper or brass, and pyr meaning fire, by Johann Friedrich Henckel in 1725; it contained copper, but struck a spark with steel like pyrite. This large specimen sits next to my fireplace Reference #0450 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Corundum Al2O3 Locality acquired 1970s Matrix Calcite There are several unceretain candidates for this name, but it was first formally applied to this mineral by Anton Estner in 1795. Reference #0390 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Dunite (a variety of Olivine) (Mg,Fe)2SiO4 individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Quincy mine
Houghton, Michigan
1996 Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Comments Reference #0317, #0318 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Datolite (variety porcelain) Ca2B2(SiO4)2(OH) individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Michigan acquired 1996 Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Named after the Greek words datysthai meaning to devide, and lithos meaning stone, by Jens Esmark in 1805. Reference #CC 37 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
DogTooth Spar Calcite CaCO3 Joplin, Missouri acquired 1960s Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Calcite was named from the Latin word calx which means burnt lime. First use of the name was probably by Johann Karl Freisleben on 1836, but first use as applied today was probably by E.J. Chapman in 1843. Reference #0361 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Enargite Cu2AsS4 individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Hancock, Michigan 1997 Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Named from the Greek word enarge meaning distinct or apparent by Friedrich A. Breithaupt in 1850. Reference #0448, #0449, #0477, #0478, #0479 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Fluorite Crystals CaF2 Lafarge quarry
Niagra Falls, New York
When Collected Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Name derived from the Latin verb fluere meaning to flow (it melts easily) by Georg Agricola in 1546. Reference #0410, #0411, #0412 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Fluorite CaF2 individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Macomb, New York When Collected Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Name derived from the Latin verb fluere meaning to flow (it melts easily) by Georg Agricola in 1546. Reference #0476 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Fluorite (variety Blue John) CaF2 individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Derbyshire, England acquired 1980s Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Name derived from the Latin verb fluere meaning to flow (it melts easily) by Georg Agricola in 1546. Blue John was in general use as a term for fluorite when the name was established, but properly refers only to the variety of fluorite found at Derbyshire. Reference #60P Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Feldspar (variety orthoclase) KAlSi3O8 individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Locality When Collected Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Probably named as a contraction of the common name of Fieldspar by Johan Gottschalk Wallerius in 1747. Reference #0292 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Feldspar (Amazonestone, or Amazonite, variety microcline) KAlSi3O8 individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Colorado acquired 1979 Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Feldspar was probably named as a contraction of the common name of Fieldspar by Johan Gottschalk Wallerius in 1747. Amazonite was named after the Amazon River in Brasil by Friedrich A. Breithaupt in 1847. Reference #0323, #0397, #0475 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Gypsum CaSO4 2H2O Alabastine mine
Grand Rapids, Michigan
1988 Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Probably named for the Greek word gypsos meaning plaster. Gypsum mining in Grand Rapids started in the spring of 1843 when Richard E. Butterworth uncovered a layer of it while plowing. This turned into the Grand Rapids Gypsum Co. in 1860 (and bought by Domtar Industries Inc. in 1981), which is the oldest continuously operating gypsum mine in in the world. The Alabastine mine was a competetor who's output was used to make sparkling/glittering alabastine paint. Reference #0314, #0346, #0474 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Galena PbS individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Joplin, Missouri acquired 1997 Matrix Dolomite The Latin word galena means lead ore. Reference #0293, #0294 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Graphite C
Seathwaite mine
Borroudale, Cumbria, England
acquired 1997 Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) The Seathwaite mine supplied the first ever pencil factory in Keswick, England. It was named from the Greek verb graphein meaning to write by Abraham Gottlob Werner in 1789. Reference #0365 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Graphite C individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Ticonderoga, New York acquired 1950s Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Named from the Greek verb graphein meaning to write by Abraham Gottlob Werner in 1789. Reference #0311 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Geode - Amethyst Formula
South Dakota acquired 1960s Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Comments Reference #0394 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Geode Formula individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Dale Hollow, TN probably 1930s, acquired 1960s Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Comments Reference #0325, #0326 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Geode Formula individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Sheffler mine
Illinois
When Collected Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Comments Reference #0307 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Hematite Fe2O3 individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Locality When Collected Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Comments Reference #0337, #0338, #0339, #0336, #0367 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Hedenbergite CaFeSi2O6

Locality acquired 1980s Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Comments Reference #0295 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Halite NaCl individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Detroit, Michigan acquired 1980 Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Comments Reference #0473 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Indian Pipestone (Hematite Sandstone) Fe2O3 individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Pipestone, MN acquired 1960s Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Comments Reference #0382 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Igneous Rocks formed at high temperatures or from molten materials individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Locality When Collected Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Comments Reference Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Jasper (a variety of Quartz) SiO2 individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Drummond Island, Michigan 1967 Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Comments Reference #0431 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Kernite Na2B4O7 4H2O individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Locality When Collected Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Comments Reference #0472 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Kona Dolamite CaMg(CO3)2 Locality acquired 1960 Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Comments Reference #0471 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Lazurite Na4-5Al3Si3O12S individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Afghanistan acquired 1978 Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Comments Reference #0310, #0428 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Lodestone (Magnetite) Fe3O4 individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Locality When Collected Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Comments Reference #0407 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Lepidolite K2Li3Al4Si7O21(OH,F)3 individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Brasil acquired 1997 Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Comments Reference #0396 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Muscovite Mica KAl3Si3O10(OH)2 individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Mount Mica, Maine acquired 1960s Matrix Green Tourmaline Comments Reference #0422, #0423, #0424 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Meteorite Fe individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Meteor Crater, AZ When Collected Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Comments Reference #0359 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Marcasite FeS2 Locality When Collected Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Comments Reference #0376 Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Metamorphic rocks altered by heat, pressure, and/or chemical action individual specimen picture not yet available

this specimen may be included in the group pictures at the beginning and end of this section

Locality When Collected Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Comments Reference Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)
Principal Mineral(s) Formula Locality When Collected Matrix Secondary Mineral(s) Comments Reference Hardness Streak Specific Gravity Crystal Form(s)


The Second Half of This Display and Even More From My Collection

or Return to Catalog Index




Someday I hope to have my entire collection posted here. Until then, I hope you enjoy what I have posted so far. Come back again as I plan to update my catalog pages monthly.


Page A: Magnificent Obsessions Collection
Page B: Magnificent Obsessions Collection


Index by Mineral Name


Index by Mineral Type

Native Elements
Sulfides, Arsenides, Tellurides
Oxides
Halides
Carbonates
Nitrates and Borates
Sulfates
Phosphates, Arsenates, Vanadates, Chromates, and Uranates
Tungstates, Wolframates, and Molybdates
Silica Group (open network)
Tectosilicates (framework structures)
Phyllosilicates (sheet structures from sharing three oxygen)
Inosilicates (chain silicates)
Cyclosilicates (a ring structure)
Sorosilicates (two tetrahedra share one oxygen)
Nesosilicates (no direct sharing between tetrahedra)
Complex Silicates (share two or more of the other forms)
Organic and Odd/Exception Minerals


Numerical Index; 0000-0249
Numerical Index; 0250-0449
Numerical Index; 0500-0749
Numerical Index; 0750-0999
Numerical Index; 1000-1249
Numerical Index; 1250-1499
Numerical Index; 1500-1749
Numerical Index; 1750-1999
Numerical Index; 2000-2249
Numerical Index; 2250-2499
Numerical Index; 2500-2749
Numerical Index; 2750-2999
Numerical Index; 3000-3249
Numerical Index; 4250-4499
Numerical Index; 4500-4749
Numerical Index; 5000-5249
Numerical Index; 5250-5499
Numerical Index; 6250-6499
Numerical Index; 8750-8999
Numerical Index; 12250-12499
Numerical Index; 12500-12749
Numerical Index; 13000-13249
Numerical Index; 80750-80999




Current date and time is Tuesday, 17-Oct-2017 19:59:34 EDT and the Greenwich date and time is Tuesday, 17-Oct-2017 23:59:34 GMT. You are viewing this page from 54.196.72.162 and are visitor number 4659. This page was first published on 1 September 1998 and was last updated on Thursday, 08-Sep-2005 23:00:26 EDT.


You can return to The Tomaszewski Family Public Home Page, or visit my personal homepage for more Rockhounding information, or check out my collection of links for rockhounds, or read about Labeling and Cataloging Rocks, Minerals, and Fossils, or review some field trip reports, or learn how to make your own lapidary equipment, or send me Email at Kreigh@Tomaszewski.net